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January 17, 2008

Comments

Arlene

Luke is adorable. He may think that if he stands quietly enough behind the tree,no one can see him in his game of hide and seek. At this point I think everyone is looking forward to the big thaw and the smells of spring.

Laura

haha silly luke must be the most photographed foal in Romania! It is cute when horses make 'friends' with one another (or with other animals!) At the Morgan farm where I work, there were two foals born within a month of each other and they were inseparable for months until the filly was sold. There is an older filly who was born the previous summer and had no companions her age and when we finally let her out with the little ones, she gleefully whizzed around the pasture chasing them while the game from their perspective was probably rather terrifying. Now it's just the older filly and the little colt and they alternate who chases whom around the pasture, veering past trees and blasting through the brush while the older mares irritably saunter away. It's funny when animal behavior so closely mimics that of humans...

Callie

He does look like he's playing hide and seek. Long time before spring gets here........

Deborah

I know what you mean about the smells being missing... I have been working outside all day in sub-zero (Fahrenheit!) temps for the past couple of days, and about all I can smell outside is the wood-smoke from our fire, even while cleaning stalls each morning after turning out. Tonight we are supposed to have 25 degrees below (F) let's see, that's around 35 below zero Centigrade, right? I'm always afraid to touch the horses' ears at those temperatures, for fear they'll snap off! How do they stand it? Yet there is something wonderful about the cleansing power of the cold; the horses seem to stand it much better than our ninety-degree heat with flies, ticks and mosquitos in the summmer. 3 cheers for four seasons!

Victoria Cummings

Luke is my kind of guy. What are your plans for him? Stallion or gelding? And mint in the hay - how interesting- I've never heard of that. I love the smell of good hay. When Siete was little, we used to pony her around everywhere we could, using a big Paint named Splash as her leader. She got used to all the scary things like the tractors and learned that since they didn't bother Uncle Splash, they wouldn't bother her.

Transylvanianhorseman

Luke is a most loveable foal, and curious now that he is finding out about the world and how he fits into it. The cats fascinate him.

I haven't decided whether to have Luke gelded, anyway that won't need to be done for a year yet. I don't like keeping a horse isolated because he is a stallion. If I don't want to use him for breeding then he's better gelded and allowed to go out with the others. On the other hand, Doru is a stallion and quite safe turned out with geldings. I'll wait and see how Luke turns out.

None of the meadows around here have ever been sprayed, so they are full of wild flowers. I ought to post some photos. Hence the mint and many other herbs besides.

Sarah

Our horses would stand by the water trough after breakfast. That was where the sun was.

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