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March 12, 2008

Comments

Anne

That's wild! Something's up with y'all. I hope it's all good.

I didn't know dogs, cats and horses could have passports. (I travel with humans only.)

The snow was beautiful but I'm sure it's nice to see it go.

Dragos

I understand your astonishment, Julian; I just helped a friend who is relocating himself and his horse to UK, to have some blood analysis done in Bucharest; I saw then also the passport issued for his horse (the nr.000001 in that county) - it looks similar with one I saw in Austria 2 years ago, including an addendum with diagrams of horse and its markings.
As for microchips, one friend from Cluj told me that the "standard" microchip type used in RO has beeng already changed twice (from 12 characters to 16 characters, if I recall).... who knows what next years might bring to people with horses in this country....

Laura

I can only imagine how maddening these constant regulations and rules and such are! How on earth does the government expect its significantly rural population to understand and comply with these various taxes and such? And furthermore, doesn't anyone in a higher up position see that these rules just hobble all innovation and change, nevermind even allow for a peaceful, calm status quo?

BarnGoddess

wow. passports? if used properly, it would be a good system I should think, but the description/photo of the horse should be allowed.

Scooter has a brand and his AQHA papers show hi markings...otherwise, horses in American do not even have an identity card, bad huh?

What a hassle, I hope the chips work out....

greedy people suck.

I amswered your Ojibwe language question as best I could over at the Res...I hope to take an Osage language class next fall.

BarnGoddess

geesh, I cannot even type today!

Callie

Wow, unbelievable! Depends on the state, they are starting the microchip system for all livestock including horses, which brings us back to well, I won't even say it. It varies from state to state.

Transylvanianhorseman

It has good and bad sides. Registering horses enables blood tests to be done, so that equine anaemia (which used to be a serious problem) has been eliminated. It also allows vaccination against anthrax. The cats and dogs are all vaccinated against rabies. On the other hand, everyone has to pay extra taxes, and there is a whole lot more paperwork.

As someone said, the difference between liberty and totalitarianism is ideological, not technological. Microchips and computerised records can be useful to control disease. A problem here is all the bureaucracy, especially as rural vets aren't necessarily equipped to cope. (Our village doctor, for that matter, needs his teenage daughter to keep his computerised records up to date!)

Another problem is the temptation to meddle. Another new law criminalises breeding using an "unauthorised" stallion. I hope that this doesn't result in stallions being selected based on pedigree rather than proven working ability. The peasants want to breed with a stallion that is a good worker.

I can see from the serial numbers that my horses use at least two different types of microchip.

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